Anonymous asked: Do you know Japanese?

orusama:

lezbhonest:

pizza-queen:

thelesbianguide:

tardistiles:

thesunwillrise3466:

equalityabovehate:

I live in Ohio and I am super excited about this news!

aww! yay ohio!

More and more states are doing this, and I’m so happy. It’s like a domino effect.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/04/14/ohio-gay-marriage-court/7691313/

!

so happy for all my friends and fellow queers in ohio!

nbchannibal:

That time Will Graham real talked Chilton so hard.

banavalope:

reminder that kanji is my favorite

tycho-science:

4 main characters coping with the fact that they are royally fucked cause the only guy who has his shit together just up and disappeared and now they have to be Scoobydoo amature Ghostbusters.

waweyn:

She just died like 17 times in that fight

eeriie:

Performance of “Math Nightmares” (Vassar College, 1890)

odditiesoflife:

The Amazing Dekotora Trucks of Japan

Covered in chrome and gleaming neon, big rigs from across Japan are sporting amazing light shows that rival even the brightest of casinos. The practice of turning one’s truck into a moving piece of art and light show is known as Dekotora. Sometimes simply referred to as Japanese art trucks, these incredible masterpieces on four wheels have become a symbol of a Japanese subculture for decades now and the trend is still gaining momentum.

Dekotora is an abbreviation for “decoration truck.” What defines the Dekotora art movement is to add as many decorations to your truck as possible, while keeping it operational and street legal. Neon lights, flashy spoilers, manga and kabuki artworks are all part of the Dekotora movement.

There are three main Dekotora styles – Kansai, Kant and Retro, and starting with the late 1990s, the Gundam franchise has had a huge influence on the world of Dekotora as well.

The Dekotora movement was born in 1975, when Toei released the first of its 10-movie series called Trucker, which featured a truck driver who drove his incredibly decorated truck all over Japan. The movie formed a subculture of people transforming their own big rigs to resemble what they saw on screen and it took off from there. Dekotora communities provide people the opportunity to show off their creations and interact with other art-truck enthusiasts. These big rigs really light up the highways of Japan and offer beautiful visions of colorful moving artwork.

sources 1, 2, 3

chandra75:

George Takei,

You rule. 

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Hey guys here's just a random blog filled with random things...mostly my thoughts and what i find amusing, so enjoy. El Psy Congroo
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